Blight removal continues in Charleroi, PA

Charleroi, PA, September 17th, 2019 –The Mon Valley Alliance (MVA), owner of the blighted Coyle building in Charleroi, PA, rejected two offers to purchase the property for lack of funding and no evidence to support the ability to renovate or restore the structure, among other items.

“Mobilization has occurred on the demolition contract and the removal of the structure is continuing forward. Environmental remediation is complete and the building demolition, preparation of the lot, and marketing/sale of the property for new development is in process” according to Ben Brown, CEO of the MVA. This substantial investment is being made with MVA’s internal funds and no public monies are being used.

The two offers received to purchase the Coyle Properties were structurally deficient and specifically did not address the following requirements:

  1. Refusal to enter into a Non-Disclosure Agreement.
  2. Lack of a business plan outlining a sustainable operation for the property.
  3. No evidence provided of funding available, committed, or a plan to raise the funding necessary to complete a renovation/restoration of the property.
  4. No evidence provided of competency to complete a renovation/restoration of the property.
  5. Absence of escrow funds submitted to apply toward demolition contract termination.
  6. Refusal to agree to Deed Restrictions requested by Mon Valley Alliance to ensure that the renovation/restoration is completed within a reasonable timeframe.

 

The direct public support for these offers, while appreciated, was not significant with only one phone call and a handful of emails. As such, we believe the overwhelming majority of the community agrees that without the funding and a sustainable plan for the property in place, it is not prudent to risk another 20+ years of a vacant, blighted property negatively impacting the community.

As detailed in a 2016 Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania report1: “A 2013 report by the Tri-COG Collaborative in the Mon Valley, made up of 41 municipalities, calculated that blight and vacant properties cost their municipalities $11 million a year in direct costs for municipal services and $9 million a year in lost tax revenue. Blight lowers the values of surrounding properties, resulting in the annual loss of an additional $8 to $10 million in local tax collections. Also, the loss associated with the lack of economic development and reinvestment is $11,812,644 in construction impacts (one-time) and another $8,284,294 annually in ongoing impacts. 2.

Just over the past few weeks multiple break-ins at the property have required police efforts, money is again being drained from the community with solicitation efforts and a protest of 12-15 people from outside the area polluted an otherwise peaceful Labor Day holiday, casting a negative light on the community.

“We believe that every potentially viable alternative for the property has been explored and remain firm in our belief that removal of the structure and redevelopment is the best path to support the economic viability of Charleroi.”